Top 20 of ’17 Letterpress Mother’s Day Cards

She’s the witty, smart, caring, and generally all-around-awesome human being that is the anchor in your life. Count down with us the top 20 of ’17 of the sweetest, funniest, and gorgeous letterpress Mother’s Day cards to say “Thank you, Mom!”.  Let us know what you are getting your Mom this year in the comments below!

2017 Letterpress Mother's Day cards featuring sweet, flora, funny, and beautiful messages for Mom.

1. You’re The Bomb Mom by Hammerpress | 2. To A Mother Like No Other by Hunter Paper Co. | 3. Mother’s Day Sitcom Moms by Papillon Press | 4. Queen Bee by inkwell | 5. Happy Mother’s Day postcard by DD Letterpress | 6. Wonder Mom by Luxe Papery | 7. Homebrewed by Slackline Press | 8. Good Job Mom by Steel Petal Press

2017 Letterpress Mother's Day cards featuring sweet, flora, funny, and beautiful messages for Mom.

9. Mom Thank You For Everything You Do by Color Box Letterpress | 10. Marquee Mom by Oddball Press | 11. Cheers To The Best Mom Ever by Lucky Bee Press | 12. Madre by Alee Letterpress | 13. Chillax by hello! Lucky | 14. Love You Mom by indepent1

2017 Letterpress Mother's Day cards featuring sweet, flora, funny, and beautiful messages for Mom.

15. Thank You Mummy by Paper Elephant Press  | 16.  Strongest Woman I Know by Ink Meets Paper | 17.  Right Here by Smock | 18. Mom, You’re Like a Candy Bar by Loudhouse Creative  | 19. Merci Mama by Cherry Laurel Studio |  20. Lucky Mom by Sugar Paper

Letterpress City Tour: Awesome Atlanta

On our next leg of our letterpress city tour series, Meghan Paine of Iron Heart Press gives us a down-south homestyle tour of her beloved Atlanta, Georgia.  From awe-inspiring sites (Martin Luther King Jr’s birthplace, the headquarters of Coca-Cola & CNN, and former host of the 1996 Summer Olympics) to the best eats & treats, the Big Peach offers sweet artisanal shops, amazing neighborhoods, and of course, a brilliant & rising letterpress community. With Georgia on her mind, Meghan shares her printing picks, can’t-miss-spots, and insider gems.

Meghan Paine of Iron Heart Press gives us a down-south homestyle tour of her beloved Atlanta, Georgia.

A DECADE OF DOWN SOUTH LIVING I’ve lived in Atlanta for just over 10 years, so it feels like I’ve been here all my life.

FUN + FULL OF FLAVOR I spend a lot of time in my backyard, Old Fourth Ward Park, stuffing my face at Ponce City Market, and walking off the damage on the Beltline.  Old Fourth Ward Fence and Rail, Atlanta, GA.(photograph courtesy of R. Neff)

Meghan Paine of Iron Heart Press gives us a down-south homestyle tour of her beloved Atlanta, Georgia.

WELCOME ARTISANAL SHOPS Atlanta is super receptive to letterpress. Old Fourth Ward is particularly invested in the handcrafted and maker space, and there are dozens of small paper shops that feature letterpress greetings and art. The festival scene in Atlanta is huge and well-loved, so crafters have a great stage for their art.

COMING TOGETHER: ATLANTA’S PRINTMAKER STUDIO  The Atlanta Printmaker’s Studio hosts an annual event called Print Big! which features giant hand carved woodblocks, inks, and STEAM ROLLERS. STEAM ROLLERS, people! Total mic-drop event.

Print Big! even held by Atlanta Printmakers Studio in Atlanta, GA.
(photography courtesy of Atlanta Printmakers Studio)

ALL ABOUT THE COMMUNITY I currently participate as a teacher and volunteer with the Atlanta Printmakers Studio which offers amazing workshops for kids and classes for adults, and I’m happy to be a part of such a cool and meaningful organization. A few years ago I collaborated with Lifeline Animal project for a set of greeting cards to benefit animal adoptions, which is a cause very dear to my heart. Letterpress is such an awesome channel for collaboration — if there’s a message, it can be printed!

THIS COULD HAVE ONLY BEEN PRINTED IN ATLANTA I see a lot of truly original letterpress art coming out of Atlanta, but I think Atlanta is such a hub for printers who’ve lived all over the country that there’s no such thing as a homogenous style here. That diversity in art and culture is one of the many great things about the city. Everything is either unique, refreshing, or downright weird!

BUY LOCAL: ATLANTA’S BEST Letterpress printers in Atlanta are obscenely supportive and helpful, whether its sending clients to one another, sharing tips and tricks, or putting our heads together to solve a problem on a job. I feel like I’m a part of a community that I can rely on, and I work regularly with many other printers in my area.

FAV NEIGHBORHOOD PICKS Naturally, Old Fourth Ward is the best, but… I love the Highlands for drinks and a fun night out, Decatur for amazing food, and Inman Park for beautiful houses and lawns.

ATLANTA VIBE I’d describe the Old Fourth Ward vibe as “rational hipster”. Sure, we have lots of skinny jeans, fabulous mustaches, and dapper hats, but the demographic is mostly 30-something creatives and career types with just enough disposable income to support crafters and makers, drive sensible cars, and keep dozens of artistic and delicious restaurants booming. Art is crucial to this neighborhood, and you see some of the most amazing works of art in both sanctioned installations and graffiti.

WeHeartAtlanta-Mural
(photograph courtesy of 365AtlantaFamily)

One of my favorite little tags is a set of incredible koi fish “swimming” up the Beltline right in front of Paris on Ponce.

koi-graffitti-tag-atlanta-beltine

O4W takes its food and music very seriously, too, and we should — The Masquerade is an Atlanta musical institution right in the center of the neighborhood, and City Winery is bringing even more talent into our backyard.

LOCAL EATS + GREAT TREATS Bocca Lupo is hands-down my favorite restaurant in all of Atlanta. It’s a long walk or a short drive from Old Fourth Ward, but after filing my belly with delicious, imaginative Italian food, the walk is never a bad idea. The chef is a frickin’ genius. You know how some high end restaurants mix weird ingredients in bizarre ways and leave you wondering if maybe you just don’t get “fine dining”? You’ll get creative ingredients at Bocca Lupo, but I’ve never had anything that wasn’t over-the-top delicious, and I end up feeling like a foodie because I can absolutely understand why duck and kumquats belong on the same crostini.


(photography courtesy of RVA News)

I’m also obsessed with King of Pops. Outside of Atlanta, no one has really heard of them, but they got picked up by Whole Foods Market, so they’re basically on the path to world domination. King of Pops started out as a few guys with little rainbow umbrella-shaded refrigerated carts selling popsicles in the park and now I gauge whether or not I will attend an event by the likelihood of King of Pops carts. They’re headquartered in Inman Park and even sponsor a Tuesday night yoga class in O4W next to the skate park that attracts hundreds during the nicer months (read: almost all of them), so they have my vote all around. Pro Tip — try the Blackberry Ginger Lemonade.

VINTAGE SHOP FINDS Ponce City Market has all the usual big-box stuff: Lululemon, Sephora, Williams-Sonoma, Anthropologie, etc., but if you want to find some treasures, check out Paris on Ponce and Pop Marche. They’re jam packed with vintage, handmade, wonderful, and weird from furniture to clothing to books to (occasionally) motorcycles. You never know what you’ll find.


(photography courtesy of Paris on Ponce)

HISTORICAL NEIGHBORHOODS I live just down the street from Freedom Parkway, which is modestly adorned by a cast iron sculpture of Martin Luther King. Not far is the King Center and Dr. King’s home, and it’s incredibly moving to tour the sites.

Because it’s part of our town, I think it’s easy for Atlantans to forget how special these places and monuments are, but we at least have the luxury of a holiday to remind us to go out and appreciate what’s right here at home.

Meghan Paine of Iron Heart Press gives us a down-south homestyle tour of her beloved Atlanta, Georgia.

CONSTANT GROWTH Atlanta is a living, breathing organism. Neighborhoods die, revive, gentrify, and backslide from year to year. Old Fourth Ward used to be a post-industrial tire dump, but that tire dump is now the centerpiece of the neighborhood: a stunning park with ponds and waterfalls and ducks, oh my.

NOT TO BE MISSED Just around the corner in the Highlands is a little karaoke joint that only the locals know about called 10 High. Now shhh, don’t go telling everyone you heard it from me. It’s secreted away in the basement of Dark Horse Tavern, making it feel like a prohibition secret spot kinda joint, and what makes it really great is the full band that will make you sound like a rock god, with Atlanta’s own famous radio personality English Nick singing backup for you.

Also, walk the Beltline — eventually it will be built out to connect the whole city, but my favorite section, the Eastside Trail, connects Piedmont Park (worth a half day’s visit on its own) to Krog Street. You’ll see great art, smiling faces, dogs, dogs, dogs, and you can end your walk with a beer and a tasty lunch at Krog Street Market. You might even see one of Atlanta’s Tiny Doors.

Tiny Door in Atlanta, GA.

INSIDER INSIGHTS Atlanta is a really vibrant place, rich in culture and oddity. We embrace different like a big city, but we love to support our own like only a small southern town can. Come visit, and try the cobbler.

Meghan Paine of Iron Heart Press gives us a down-south homestyle tour of her beloved Atlanta, Georgia.

LETTERPRESS STUDIOS IN ATLANTA

Hyde & Seek Press Lawrenceville, GA
Atlanta Printmakers Studio – Atlanta, GA
Alee & Press – Atlanta, GA
Bumblebee Press – Atlanta, GA
Farmwood Press – Atlanta, GA
Henry & Co. – Atlanta, GA
Cherry Laurel Studio – Decatur, GA
Megan King – Avondale Estates, GA
Aureate Press – Cumming, GA

MUST-SEE STOPS

Print Big! Atlanta Printmakers Studio’s annual community art extravaganza held in the spring. Highlights include printing by steamroller.
Georgia Aquarium – Home to the Western Hemisphere’s largest aquarium.
Margaret Mitchell House – Pulitzer Prize-winning novel “Gone With the Wind” author’s birthplace.
The Martin Luther King Jr. Center – An inspiring museum center dedicated to King Jr.’s legacy.
Atlanta Jazz Festival – Free Memorial Day Jazz fest in Piedmont Park.
Marietta Diner – Try the Spinach Pie; featured in Food Network’s Diners, Drive-in, and Dives.
World of Coca Cola – Tour the famous world-famous headquarters.
Xocolatl Chocolates – Award winning bean-to-bar chocolatier.

We hope you enjoyed our second letterpress city guide! Interested in shining the spotlight on your city? Contact us today! And if you’re planning a letterpress-centric trip, be sure to check out the print trip map on Letterpress Commons!

Top 14 Valentine’s Day Letterpress Cards for 2017

Hand-picked with love, today we’re counting down 14 beautiful, silly & sweet, and brilliant 2017 Valentine’s Day letterpress cards sure to impress your sweetie and printing paramour.  Let us know what you are getting your special someone this year in the comments below!

Valentine's Day letterpress cards of 2017 feature romance, funny love, and sweet messages.

1. We Go Together PB&J by Ramona & Ruth  |  2. You’re Good At Husband Things by Sapling Press   |  3. Love Letter Cat card by Mejiro Graphics  |  4. Big Squeeze by Alee & Press | 5. Let’s Make Each Other Mixtapes by Little Goat Paper Co  |  6. I’d Still Say I Do by Benchpressed

Valentine's Day letterpress cards of 2017 feature romance, funny love, and sweet messages.

7. Happily Ever After by rbprintery  |  8. Hand-Drawn Tree Trunk With Heart by FAsInFrankPapergoods

Valentine's Day letterpress cards of 2017 feature romance, funny love, and sweet messages.

9. You’re Souper by Wild Ink Press | 10. Of All the Fish In The Sea… by McBitterson’s | 11. Love With You Rocks by Waterknot | 12. Love & Wedding by Wolf & Wren Press | 13. Hello My Love by Smock |  14. Letterpress Conversation Heart coasters by Haute Papier

2016 Letterpress Holiday Gift Guide

We’ve making a list and checking it twice for must-have gifts for the printer & letterpress aficionado in your life in our 2016 Letterpress Holiday Gift Guide. From type-inspired goodies to printing press-themed gifts, we’ve got you covered. Let us know what is on your wishlist in the comments section below!

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1. Roller Setting Gauge by Boxcar Press  |  2. Mint Chocolate bar by LetterPress | 3. Gutenberg Wooden Model kit from Oakridge Hobbies | 4. Ampersand Necklace by GwenDelicious | 5. Anatomy of Type Letterpress poster by Typography Desconstructed | 6. The Little Book of Typographic Ornament by David Jury | 7. Ink Knife from Boxcar Press | 8. Pantone Pastel Mug Set by Pantone | 9. Sigwalt holiday ornament from Briar Press |  10.  Bon a Tirer tee shirt from Studio On Fire

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11. Lorem Ipsum Throw Pillow from typehype  |  12. Type Case drawstring bag by Hollingsworth

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13. California Job Case letterpress poster by PioneerHouse  | 14. Drop Caps : 100 Postcards book by Jessica Hische  |   15. Garamond lead type smartphone case by CARO Berlin  |   16. “Every time you make a typo, the errorists win” mug by DesignsbyLindaNeeToo  |   17. Ladies of Letterpress patch by Ladies of Letterpress  |   18. Helvetica hoodie by medium control  |   19. 12″ or 18″ Line Gauge from Boxcar Press  |   20. Letterpress clock by CAPow!

Top 20 of ’16 Letterpress Valentine’s Day Cards

We count down the top 20 of ’16 Valentine’s Day letterpress cards and why not treat yourself (or your letterpress lovin’ sweetie) to a hand-picked (and pressed!) card or two for this upcoming Valentine’s Day! Let us know what you are getting your special someone this year in the comments below!

2016 Valentine's Day letterpress cards featuring sweet moments, funny cards, and letterpress beauties!

1.I Love You A Bushel And a Peck And a Hug Around the Neck card by Cherry Laurel Studio | 2. Scandinavian Folk Style Rose Pink card by Fluid Ink Letterpress | 3. Amore Forever badge card by Hammerpress | 4. Rococo Valentine Heart card by Foglio Press | 5. I Love You As Much As…. card by Paper Plates Press | 6. Cereal Love card by Paper Parasol Press

2016 Valentine's Day letterpress cards featuring sweet moments, funny cards, and letterpress beauties!

7. Hotspot Love card by Kiss and Punch designs | 8. The Moments card by Ditto Ditto Works | 9. Lobster Love card by ShedLetterpress | 10. Like Campfires card by Smock | 11. I’m Mad For You card by Rise and Shine Paper | 12. My Heart Belongs to You card by Pup and Pony

2016 Valentine's Day letterpress cards featuring sweet moments, funny cards, and letterpress beauties!

13. Lots of Love Heart card by Sugar Paper | 14. Love Ledger Paper by favorite design. | 15. You Rock My Socks card by Flyaway Paperworks. | 16. Happy Valentine’s Day card by Grey Moggie | 17. Love Bracket card by A Favorite Design | 18. We’re Purrr-fect together! card by Ratbee Press | 19. Love You Like No Otter card by McBitterson’s | 20. For Fox’s Sake I Love You card by Runaway Press

2015 Letterpress Holiday Gift Guide

Round up some holiday cheer this fabulous year with our ultimate holiday gift guide for the letterpress lover & printer. We’ve got great printing supply musts (and splurges!) as well as letterpress printed goodies that you + your crew will gush about for years to come! Let us know what is on your wishlist in the comments section below!

The 2014 Boxcar Press letterpress gift guide has gift ideas for the type-loving letterpress printer in your life - including letterpress t-shirts and more.

1. Hand Quilted Letterpress Job Case Layout Baby Quilt from BettyTurbo | 2. Different cities / tool kids pattern journal from Hartford prints | 3. Cheers for Beers art print from Baltimore Print Studios | 4. 2016 Letterpress Standing Desk Calendar from dittdittowork | 5. Star t-shirt from Starshaped Press (printed using type) | 6. Whole Bean Coffee – Printers Devil Dark Roast from Baltimore Print Studios | 7. Letterpress Printer t-shirt from Outridder | 8. Customizable letterpressed picture frame mats from Typothecary Press | 9. Pantone Universe A4 Sketchbook from Pantone | 10. Letterpress Now DIY Guide to Old and New Printing Methods from Boxcar Press

letterpress gift guide 2015 featuring aprons, books, and letterpress goodies.

11. Letterpress Type floor mat from PaperBellaPrints | 12. CMYK Earrings by Matters of Delight | 13. C&P Throw Pillow by alicing | 14. ‘Staching letterpress card from Boxcar Press | 15. Family or Friends Journal from Journaling Jane | 16. Christmas Holiday L Letterpress plates from Boxcar Press | 17. Letterpress Wallpaper in Silver Typography by Brewster | 18. Press On letterpress greeting card by Penelope’s Press | 19. Big Dictionaries bookmark from Hartford Prints | 20. California Job Case Letterpress Apron from wnybac

Let’s see that printed: Dueling Dictionaries

Here at Boxcar Press, we may be centered in the photopolymer world, but we love the look of print blocks and old time illustrations as much as anyone. So we were instantly intrigued and excited to see the artwork from John Carrera of Quercus Press come through for platemaking.  His art makes us feel nostalgic and paired with the one word text, we definitely wanted John to know we were eager to see what he was printing.

John Quercas' letterpress files are going through the platemaking process at Boxcar Press very quickly!

John not only told about his project but sent us a final copy of his fascinating book – Dueling Dictionaries. The artwork came from two dictionary companies, G. & C. Merriam and Worcester, who were rivals in the nineteenth century and tried to outdo each other with their illustrations. What’s fascinating is that the two companies shared the same engraver.

The Dueling Dictionaries letterpress printed book looks beautiful!

This saloon-door styled book also has another feature to it: by flipping open each page, the words that read across on the top and bottom change meaning with each pairing. The book also includes a great use of silver ink on the front cover, and intricate illustrations on the backs of the pages.

John also shared some of the experiences of his process on this print job.

“You can see that after I printed the first run of pages that I had laid out for the initial plates, I then cut up the plates to get the proper overlap and look. This is one of the benefits of polymer – you just can’t re-arrange and cut magnesium or copper blocks as easily. (I remember cutting many a block on the band-saw). I enjoyed working with the Vandercook on this project because it allowed me to look at each of the images as I printed them and tweak them before I got too far along. Printing these backsides has been one of the most exciting parts of the project so far.”

John Carrera of Quercus Press adds black and cool grey ink to his "Dueling Dictionaries" letterpress print project.

Using polymer plates also added some interesting aspects to the job that John describes:

“I have given a lot of thought to the difference of using polymer vs. using magnesium plates. One of the things that has been a challenge for me is that somehow knowing the plates are plastic has made me more prone to sending in copy that is not quite ready for prime time. This has happened twice to me and I don’t think I’m alone in this sloppy attitude. Although I have cut and pasted copy it’s better to remake the whole page and I have to take a little more time with my files.”

Inset details of the Dueling Dictionaries by John Quercas look beautiful!

“I also think I have pushed the envelope of how long these polymer plates can hang around, too – as I printed on some of these after they had been sitting for almost two years – the trick was keeping the edges from peeling up. In some instances I went ahead and folded them down so hard that they cracked – and in some of the plates I believe you can make out the hairline cracks in some of the images – the flunk fish had lots of little cracks. Most people won’t even notice nor will they realize that some of the lip actually broke off the image.  However, I kind of thought they looked cool and fit the book style.”

We thank John for revealing the story behind this gem of a book and for the enjoyment of his illustrations.

2015 Seattle Children’s Hospital Broadsides

Boxcar Press has a heart for projects that combine letterpress printing with children, and none is more dear to us than the Seattle Children’s Hospital Broadside project. This collaboration with 22 artists and pediatric patients always yields beautiful art and prose. The children’s ages range from 5 to 20, and through the Writers in the Schools program (WITS – a poetry program spearheaded by Sierra Nelson and Ann Teplick) the children create amazing imagery with words. The printers at the School of Visual Concepts then give their interpretation of the words. Each year we support this project by donating photopolymer plates for the limited run of 106 broadsides. We reached out to some of the printers involved this year to hear more about their experiences and how they created artwork to showcase each poem – take a look.

Seattle Children's Hospital letterpress broadsidesSeattle Children's Hospital letterpress broadsidesSeattle Children's Hospital letterpress broadsides

Ana Sofia Mariz I was fortunate to find a perfect fit in terms of the poem. My little poet was five and I also have a son of the same age. So I immediately felt engaged and connected as I felt I could hear the boy’s voice in my head. I decided to involve my own son in the project. I told him about this boy who was sick and had written this poem and that we’ll make him a beautiful “drawing” so he’ll be happy and recover faster. My poet wrote about Spiderman, so I brought that idea into the layout within a kid’s visual repertory:  drawing, coloring, and crayons.

AnaSofia-IMG1AnaSofia-IMG2

As the boy would be the Spiderman, I decided to trace my son’s hands and color them as within a Spiderman suit. They are climbing the text wall and the title would be hand drawn like a web between the hands. All the elements would reflect the imperfections of a hand drawing.

I never got to meet the boy. I guess I didn’t realize that was possible at that time, but I wish to meet him and his family some day. I can easily say that this was one of the top five most enjoyable projects I’ve ever done.

AnaSofia-IMG3

Sarah Kulfan This year was my third participating on the Seattle Children’s broadside project. I chose to print my poem using Boxcar plates because of a tight schedule and I have produced great prints with Boxcar plates previously. The poem I printed is called ‘May I’ and was written by eleven year old Kira Hoffman. I was very excited to work on this poem because the first stanza immediately made me think of my brother’s dog Roofus, who passed away this year.

Sarah Kulfan's dog Rufus was the inspiration for her Seattle Hospital Children's Broadsides project print.Sarah Kulfan's dog Rufus was the inspiration for her Seattle Hospital Children's Broadsides project print.

Initially, I was planning on asking Kira about her dog but I realized my interpretation of Kira’s poetry was part of the collaborative process that makes this project so rich. I helped raise Roofus as a pup and over the years, have created various Roofus inspired drawings and artwork. I dug up some old photos of Roofus and developed a sketch. Through Kira’s words, this would be an opportunity to commemorate the pup that I helped raise.

Sarah Kulfan's dog Rufus was the inspiration for her Seattle Hospital Children's Broadsides project print.

Jenny Wilkson who heads up the SVC letterpress shop and leads the Seattle Children’s broadside project once said that this project is one of the most sustainable efforts she’s experienced.  It’s easy to see this as many of the same printers return to donate their time and energy each year, which is one reason why I love this project. I am so honored to have printed Kira’s poem and create a keepsake for her and her family to share; and my brother got a nice birthday present this year, a last memento of his best pal, the yellow dog, Roofus.

Heidi Hespelt This was my second year participating in the Childrens’ Hospital Broadside project.  It is such a joy to be part of it. My poet is a 16 year old girl who, I hear, is now doing well and living in Portland. Her poem was strong and happy, so I chose bright colors and the Gerbera daisy image to illustrate that. I used polymer plates for the text and did a lino block reduction for the flowers.

Heidi-Hespelt-IMG6Heidi Hespelt carves out a lineoleum block for the first ink pass for her contribution to the 2015 Seattle Hospital Childrens Broadsides Project.Beautiful reduction cuts for Heidi Hespelt for the Seattle Hospital Childrens Broadsides project.

I am a bit smitten with the reduction process (to me it can be a brain twister!) where the block is carved between each pass and the parts that are carved away stay the color you just printed. Sound easy? Yep! Easy to get confused! It was a very satisfying project for me this year to master this. ​

Beautiful second color run on the Vandercook for Heidi Hespelt for the Seattle Hospital Childrens Broadsides project.Heidi-Hespelt-IMG5

Darcie Kantor Printed in black and what she calls “Darcie Yellow” because her 15 year old poet specifically titled her poem “Black and Yellow”.

Boxcar letterpress plates in action for Darcie Kantor's Seattle Hospital Children's Broadsides project print.

Many thanks to all of the printers who donated their time and efforts to this amazing project!

Lend an Ear to a Type On The Cob 2015

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This gallery contains 24 photos.

On June 10th, Harold Kyle (president of Boxcar Press), Carrie Valenzuela (a Boxcar printer) and I started on a pilgrimage to the town of Mt. Pleasant, Iowa, to immerse ourselves in the 2015 Type On The Cob conference. This Ladies of Letterpress conference is a … Continue reading