The Art of Printing: Prose, Song, and Poetry to Entertain Those in the Trade

Who doesn’t love a rousing, good ditty, or a clever, snappy poem with a wicked twist of words?  And what better than an ode about your favorite topic – printing – written by and for printers?

We recently found a digital copy of a poetry book about printing from 1833.  Turning the pages makes you feel like you are at a comfortable British pub house a couple of hundred years ago, raising a glass with inky nails, saying, “Have ye heard this one?”

The title of the book is Songs of the Press and Other Poems Relative to the Art of Printing, gathered by T. Kirk, Printer of Nottingham, 1833.  It is available for download at www.openlibrary.org.

One of the gems we found included a curse or censure by a printer who called down mayhem on his colleague.

Printing Prose Song and Poetry: Vintage pressman illustration(illustration courtesy of Briarpress.org)

The Poet’s Anathema by R.S. Coffin

On a printer who had displeased him.
May all your columns fall in pie,
Each chase be gnawed by rust;
Weak, weak as water be your lye,
Your cases filled with dust.
May all your sticks untrue be made,
Your frames too high or low;
No page upon the stone be laid
Where it should rightly go.

Printing Prose Song and Poetry: Book an Job Printers Illustration(illustration courtesy of Briarpress.org)

How about a song on the Origin of Printing by Dodd, in particular, one that praises good printing and the demise of hand-copying.

Aided by thee, the printed page
Conveys instruction to each age;
When in one hour more sheets appear,

Than Scribes could copy in a year.

An anonymous poet captured that moment when a printer gets what he is looking for…

Printing Prose Song and Poetry: Printer's Kiss poem

Print on my lip another kiss.
The picture of thy glowing passion;
Nay, this won’t do— nor this — nor this —
But now — Ay, that’s a proof impression!

One more thought to give some perspective on what it meant when you held a book in the 1800’s and the nice thought that countless of our fellow fine press printers still handle many of these tasks themselves.

The following twenty-two occupations are engaged to produce a single book (circa 1873):-The author, the designer, the rag merchant, the paper maker, the stationer, the type founder, the press maker, the ink maker, the roller maker, the chase maker, the reader, the compositor, the press­man, the gatherer, the folder, the stitcher, the leather seller, the binder, the coppersmith, the engraver, the copper-plate printer, and the bookseller.

Are you inspired to pen your own sonnet or lyric to printing?  Send us your verse in the comments section below!

In search of the perfect printing ink – why not do it yourself?

Letterpress printers have many tools at their disposal, such as presswash, line gauges and quoins. Not the least of these is their favored printing ink. Broach this subject with a group of printers in person or an online forum and most can hotly debate the one they can’t live without.

(photograph courtesy of coloranthistory.org. Those interested in purchasing a 13″x19″ archival poster print can reach out to Andy here. )

Yes, we are going to step into that debate and ask specifically which black printing ink do you hold in high esteem but before we do that, we want to entertain you with an article from a book that gives the recipe for making your own.  Looks pretty simple to us but you decide.

The sage instructions of experience come from this book found on openlibrary.org

Six Hundred Receipts, Worth Their Weight in Gold by John Marquardt of Lebanon, PA.

Turn to page 75 – Receipt No. 138  How to make Black Printer’s Ink.

“Printers’ ink is a real black paint, composed of lampblack and linseed-oil, which has undergone a degree of heat superior to that of common drying oils. The manner of preparing it is extremely simple. Boil the linseed-oil in a large iron pot for 8 hours, adding to it bits of toasted bread the purpose of absorbing the water contained in the oil; let it rest till the following morning, and then expose it to the same degree of heat for 8 hours more, or till it has acquired the consistence required; then add lamp-black worked up with a mixture of oil of turpentine and turpentine.

The consistence depends on the degree of heat given to the oil, and the quantity of lampblack mixed up with it; and this consistence is regulated by the strength of the paper for which the ink is intended.

The preparations of printers’ ink should take place in the open air, to prevent the bad effects arising from the vapor of the burnt oil, and, in particular, to guard against accident by fire.”

If one receipt isn’t enough, another is available on page 264 , No. 597  An Excellent Printing-Ink.

Balsam of copaiva, (or Canada balsam,) 9 ounces; lampblack, 3 ounces; indigo and Prussian blue, each 5 drachms; Indian red, 3/4 ounce; yellow soap, (dry,) 3 ounce. Grind it to an impalpable smoothness. Mix with old linseed oil. “

In case you are wondering – the drachms is a unit of weight formerly used by apothecaries, equivalent to 60 grains or one eighth of an ounce.

Letterpress printers, as a group, seem to be interested in trying new things for their art, so we hope that these two recipes might get a try-out or two from someone.  However, it is also fun to note that within the 598 other receipts in this book, you can also find a recipe for peppermint cordial, a cure for the bite of a mad dog, and treatment for scabby heads on children and toothaches.  

Back to our original question, we truly are interested in hearing about your favorite black printing ink, either ones you have used in the past and can’t find anymore or one you use everyday.

Tell us in the comments below!

Margery Cantor: On Why I Love Letterpress

I first learned about letterpress at the West Coast Print Center, where I was employed working in the camera department. There was a Vandercook Proof Press and Joanna Drucker was printing a book. I was enchanted and watched closely, the process seemed both logical and magical. Sometime after I left the Print Center I began to work for Adrian Wilson and that is when I really fell for the craft. What was it, the smells; the texture of papers; the rhythm quiet, thoughtful and methodical; the mastery of a machine that changed history? And then to see that all the patience and attention gives way to page; a broadside; a book that is simply beautiful to hold and to read. Why do I love letterpress, I think because the craft encourages the practitioner to give oneself over to the process and that giving over shows a willingness to try for perfection, again and again.

Margery Cantor has designed books for many presses in California, such as the Stanford University Press and the University of California Press.  She is currently at The Impermanent Press in Norwich, Vermont and is still printing.  A recent work is the letterpress version of Illustrated by Lynd Ward: From the Collection of Robert Dance (The Grolier Club).

Passionate about printing? Head-over-heels for letterpress? Let us know why you are love with letterpress in the comments below!

On My Own Time Art Gallery Exhibition at Boxcar Press

By day, the majority of our staff here at Boxcar Press is surrounded by creativity during their workdays— whether it’s designing and illustrating invitations and stationery, or putting ink to paper and printing heirloom pieces. When it comes to their downtime, though, many of our employees have artistic skills beyond the world of letterpress. We had the pleasure of getting to see some of the art from our employees through an exhibition as part of the On My Own Time program through CNY Arts — in total, we had 21 pieces on display from six artists on our staff. Three of the pieces were selected to go on to the larger On My Own Time exhibit that will take place at the Everson Museum in Syracuse this fall. Here’s a peek at our gallery!

The 2017 On My Own Time Boxcar Press art gallery exhibit

The 2017 Boxcar Press On My Own Time Exhibit

The 2017 On My Own Time Boxcar Press art gallery exhibit

Artist: Jennifer DeRoberts

The 2017 On My Own Time Boxcar Press art gallery exhibit

Artist: Jennifer DeRoberts

The 2017 On My Own Time Boxcar Press art gallery exhibit

Artist: Madeline Bartley

The 2017 On My Own Time Boxcar Press art gallery exhibit

Artist: Madeline Bartley

The 2017 On My Own Time Boxcar Press art gallery exhibit

Artist: Clayton Estey

The 2017 On My Own Time Boxcar Press art gallery exhibit

Artist: Rebecca Miller

The 2017 On My Own Time Boxcar Press art gallery exhibit

Artist: Carrie Valenzuela

The 2017 On My Own Time Boxcar Press art gallery exhibit

Artist: Carrie Valenzuela

The 2017 On My Own Time Boxcar Press art gallery exhibit

Artist: Carrie Valenzuela

The 2017 On My Own Time Boxcar Press art gallery exhibit

Artist: Thomas Abbamont

Top 20 of ’17 Letterpress Mother’s Day Cards

She’s the witty, smart, caring, and generally all-around-awesome human being that is the anchor in your life. Count down with us the top 20 of ’17 of the sweetest, funniest, and gorgeous letterpress Mother’s Day cards to say “Thank you, Mom!”.  Let us know what you are getting your Mom this year in the comments below!

2017 Letterpress Mother's Day cards featuring sweet, flora, funny, and beautiful messages for Mom.

1. You’re The Bomb Mom by Hammerpress | 2. To A Mother Like No Other by Hunter Paper Co. | 3. Mother’s Day Sitcom Moms by Papillon Press | 4. Queen Bee by inkwell | 5. Happy Mother’s Day postcard by DD Letterpress | 6. Wonder Mom by Luxe Papery | 7. Homebrewed by Slackline Press | 8. Good Job Mom by Steel Petal Press

2017 Letterpress Mother's Day cards featuring sweet, flora, funny, and beautiful messages for Mom.

9. Mom Thank You For Everything You Do by Color Box Letterpress | 10. Marquee Mom by Oddball Press | 11. Cheers To The Best Mom Ever by Lucky Bee Press | 12. Madre by Alee Letterpress | 13. Chillax by hello! Lucky | 14. Love You Mom by indepent1

2017 Letterpress Mother's Day cards featuring sweet, flora, funny, and beautiful messages for Mom.

15. Thank You Mummy by Paper Elephant Press  | 16.  Strongest Woman I Know by Ink Meets Paper | 17.  Right Here by Smock | 18. Mom, You’re Like a Candy Bar by Loudhouse Creative  | 19. Merci Mama by Cherry Laurel Studio |  20. Lucky Mom by Sugar Paper

Letterpress City Tour: San Francisco

In our third excursion of our letterpress city tour series, the cheery Kim Austin of Austin Press shows us the brilliant printing world that weaves its way through the vibrant San Francisco, California community. Beyond the year-round fog, iconic Golden Gate Bridge, and rows of colorful Victorian Houses, San Fran offers a haven for printers and artisans alike. Kim shows us around her historic Pier 70 neighborhood and beyond. Similar to her beautiful letterpress prints, the city is “where elegance meets function.”

Kim Austin of Austin Press (San Francisco) tours us through her creative and brilliant community.(All photography courtesy of Kim Austin unless otherwise noted.)

CALIFORNIA DREAMING I moved to San Francisco in 1988, just after graduating from college. I came here out of my life long desire to move to the city from the suburbs and also to go to graduate school to study photography.

DAILY LIFE Well, mostly my studio. I work a lot. But it is such an amazing place. Pier 70 is one of the oldest shipyards in the country. Lots of history and texture. My quarter of the town is also quite great. Bayview, the Mission, Dogpatch, Soma … all great neighborhoods with lots of functional and fun outlets.

The Noonan Building in the Pier 70 disctrict of San Francisco houses Kim Austin of Austin Press.Kim Austin of Austin Press (San Francisco) tours us through her creative and brilliant community.

MUCH LOVE FOR SAN FRAN I love SF. Always have since I was a kid. It is a beautiful city and it has always had a funky edge, which is such an important quality for artists. I made art here for years before I ventured into letterpress. It was a seamless transition for me. And yes, letterpress is much loved in our city.

The Mission of San Francisco has beautiful murals and creative energy.(Photography courtesy of The Bayview Performing Arts Workshop.org)

RICH IN LETTERPRESS RESOURCES There are some great resources here: Center for the Book being one of them. We also have Dependable Letterpress that has recently opened its doors for public events. The American Bookbinders Museum and Arion Press/ M and H Type are also great.

Center for the Book Arts in San Francisco. Center for the Book Arts in San Francisco.(Photography courtesy of Center for the Book Arts)

FAVORITE LOCAL COLLABORATION The open studio organized by Artspan is a fun event that artists participate in city-wide. We open our studios to the public for a whole weekend to share our work and process with the community. It is fun to welcome everyone from kids to grandparents and share the curious world of letterpress with them. Everyone is always fascinated. Letterpress seems to have a universal appeal.

Kim Austin of Austin Press (San Francisco) tours us through her creative and brilliant community.

SAN FRAN STYLE Well, of course, there is Hatch and Hamilton. We all bow to them and their brilliance. But I think anyone who takes the time to learn letterpress and struggle through the physical and emotional process is deserving of admiration. It is something you really have to work out on your own and when you do that, it speaks for itself.

COMMUNITY SUPPORT Lots of printers find their way to Kelly Paper for the basics: ink, paper, solvents, etc. Logo Graphics is another print shop that lends a helping hand to those starting out or in need of assistance.

FAVORITE NEIGHBORHOODS Pier 70 has long been a favorite spot for me: abandoned brick buildings, the bay, stray kitties… it is such a unique place – unpolished, with lots of texture. The Mission has also been such a fun part of my life here in SF. Ever-changing, lots to see, and do, and eat. again unpolished and lively! Artists work in Pier 70, every slice of life lives in The Mission. Pier 70 was the port where ships were built and rope was made. Workers flooded here during the day. The Mission has historically been the Latino neighborhood full of small shops and eateries to meet the locals needs.

 Pier 70 in San Francisco offers thriving creative and production scenes.Pier 70 in San Francisco offers thriving creative and production scenes.Pier 70 district.
(photograph courtesy of www.pier70sf.com)

FOOD + EATS El Toro for a great taco. Zuni for roasted chicken and oysters, Serpentine for great local SF vibe, Out the Door for the best Vietnamese, Mitchell’s for ice cream, All Good Pizza for sitting outside on a picnic bench in the center of the city.

SHOP ’TIL YOU DROP  The Mission is full of great interesting small shops. Dog Patch has lots of local makers, and of course, you have to go downtown to Union Square, right?

FESTIVAL + FAIRS We have lots of open street fairs, food fairs, holiday markets, and makers markets. You can also find music venues, lectures, and performances. Check out Yerba Buena for ongoing events. Bottom of the Hill has a great calendar of contemporary music. City lectures for the arts are also quite fun.

A LIVING, BREATHING CITY So many changes! Bayview is a neighborhood in transition but still holds tight to its history and locals. Dog Patch is now on the world scene. Pier 70 will be one of the most visited ports in the near future – think the Highline in NYC.

Center for the Book Arts in San Francisco.The Dogpatch in San Francisco.(top: The Bayview photography courtesy of Bayviewperformingartsworkshop.com | bottom: Dogpatch photography courtesy of Peter DaSilva)

FUN + DOWNTIME SPOTS Love Kabuki Spa for total chill. Also driving a bit down the coast to Sam’s Chowder House is such a treat and nothing is better than a healthy walk in Lands End.

CITY SPIRIT Well, we are good people. SF/CA is a place for those who think a little bit differently. We come here to find a path that is unique, not cookie cutter. We strive to look out for others and do the right thing. The weather helps and so does being close to water- on both sides!

Friend of the Urban Forest helps clean up neighborhoods in San Francisco.

HIDDEN GEM Kelly’s Mission Rock. It has been here forever and sits right on the water. Funky, lots of old wood including recycled bleacher seats to create the facade. Seagulls, views, and the best fish and chips and seafood salad anywhere. You can eat outside on the wooden deck and look across the bay to Oakland. Often there are huge container ships from far-off lands in the dock of Pier 70. The vibe is local and mellow. Dogs are welcome!

LETTERPRESS STUDIOS IN SAN FRANCISCO
San Francisco Center for the Book – San Francisco, CA
The Aesthetic Union – San Francisco, CA
Dependable Letterpress – San Francisco, CA
Noble Impressions – San Francisco, CA
M and H Type / Arion Press – San Francisco, CA
In Haus Press – San Francisco, CA
Paperflirt – San Francisco, CA
Ladybones Print Shop – San Francisco, CA
Thrysus Press – Berkeley, CA
Set In Motion Press – Berkeley, CA
Peter Koch Printers – Berkeley, CA 

MUST-SEE STOPS
American Bookbinders Museum – North America’s only museum dedicated to preserving and sharing the beautiful artistry and craftwork that is bookbinding.
Golden Gate Bridge – No trip to the San Fransisco area would be complete without stopping in at this iconic bridge with breathtaking views.
Chinese New Year Festival and Parade  Internationally-renowned Chinese New Year parade featuring a 270-foot Golden Dragon and thousands of parade-goers each year.
Seward Street Slide – Let your inner kid out and slide down these public concrete slides.
John’s Grill – The infamous diner where Sam Spade of 1941 noir film classic The Maltese Falcon orders his “chops, baked potatoes, sliced tomatoes”.
Lombard Street – Like the Golden Gate bridge, this landmark is worth the 27-degree incline uphill walk.
POPOS – 68 privately owned public open spaces scattered throughout the city.

We hope you enjoyed our third installment of our letterpress city guide! Interested in showing your city some love? Contact us today! And if you’re planning a letterpress-centric trip, be sure to check out the print trip map on Letterpress Commons!

Letterpress City Tour: Awesome Atlanta

On our next leg of our letterpress city tour series, Meghan Paine of Iron Heart Press gives us a down-south homestyle tour of her beloved Atlanta, Georgia.  From awe-inspiring sites (Martin Luther King Jr’s birthplace, the headquarters of Coca-Cola & CNN, and former host of the 1996 Summer Olympics) to the best eats & treats, the Big Peach offers sweet artisanal shops, amazing neighborhoods, and of course, a brilliant & rising letterpress community. With Georgia on her mind, Meghan shares her printing picks, can’t-miss-spots, and insider gems.

Meghan Paine of Iron Heart Press gives us a down-south homestyle tour of her beloved Atlanta, Georgia.

A DECADE OF DOWN SOUTH LIVING I’ve lived in Atlanta for just over 10 years, so it feels like I’ve been here all my life.

FUN + FULL OF FLAVOR I spend a lot of time in my backyard, Old Fourth Ward Park, stuffing my face at Ponce City Market, and walking off the damage on the Beltline.  Old Fourth Ward Fence and Rail, Atlanta, GA.(photograph courtesy of R. Neff)

Meghan Paine of Iron Heart Press gives us a down-south homestyle tour of her beloved Atlanta, Georgia.

WELCOME ARTISANAL SHOPS Atlanta is super receptive to letterpress. Old Fourth Ward is particularly invested in the handcrafted and maker space, and there are dozens of small paper shops that feature letterpress greetings and art. The festival scene in Atlanta is huge and well-loved, so crafters have a great stage for their art.

COMING TOGETHER: ATLANTA’S PRINTMAKER STUDIO  The Atlanta Printmaker’s Studio hosts an annual event called Print Big! which features giant hand carved woodblocks, inks, and STEAM ROLLERS. STEAM ROLLERS, people! Total mic-drop event.

Print Big! even held by Atlanta Printmakers Studio in Atlanta, GA.
(photography courtesy of Atlanta Printmakers Studio)

ALL ABOUT THE COMMUNITY I currently participate as a teacher and volunteer with the Atlanta Printmakers Studio which offers amazing workshops for kids and classes for adults, and I’m happy to be a part of such a cool and meaningful organization. A few years ago I collaborated with Lifeline Animal project for a set of greeting cards to benefit animal adoptions, which is a cause very dear to my heart. Letterpress is such an awesome channel for collaboration — if there’s a message, it can be printed!

THIS COULD HAVE ONLY BEEN PRINTED IN ATLANTA I see a lot of truly original letterpress art coming out of Atlanta, but I think Atlanta is such a hub for printers who’ve lived all over the country that there’s no such thing as a homogenous style here. That diversity in art and culture is one of the many great things about the city. Everything is either unique, refreshing, or downright weird!

BUY LOCAL: ATLANTA’S BEST Letterpress printers in Atlanta are obscenely supportive and helpful, whether its sending clients to one another, sharing tips and tricks, or putting our heads together to solve a problem on a job. I feel like I’m a part of a community that I can rely on, and I work regularly with many other printers in my area.

FAV NEIGHBORHOOD PICKS Naturally, Old Fourth Ward is the best, but… I love the Highlands for drinks and a fun night out, Decatur for amazing food, and Inman Park for beautiful houses and lawns.

ATLANTA VIBE I’d describe the Old Fourth Ward vibe as “rational hipster”. Sure, we have lots of skinny jeans, fabulous mustaches, and dapper hats, but the demographic is mostly 30-something creatives and career types with just enough disposable income to support crafters and makers, drive sensible cars, and keep dozens of artistic and delicious restaurants booming. Art is crucial to this neighborhood, and you see some of the most amazing works of art in both sanctioned installations and graffiti.

WeHeartAtlanta-Mural
(photograph courtesy of 365AtlantaFamily)

One of my favorite little tags is a set of incredible koi fish “swimming” up the Beltline right in front of Paris on Ponce.

koi-graffitti-tag-atlanta-beltine

O4W takes its food and music very seriously, too, and we should — The Masquerade is an Atlanta musical institution right in the center of the neighborhood, and City Winery is bringing even more talent into our backyard.

LOCAL EATS + GREAT TREATS Bocca Lupo is hands-down my favorite restaurant in all of Atlanta. It’s a long walk or a short drive from Old Fourth Ward, but after filing my belly with delicious, imaginative Italian food, the walk is never a bad idea. The chef is a frickin’ genius. You know how some high end restaurants mix weird ingredients in bizarre ways and leave you wondering if maybe you just don’t get “fine dining”? You’ll get creative ingredients at Bocca Lupo, but I’ve never had anything that wasn’t over-the-top delicious, and I end up feeling like a foodie because I can absolutely understand why duck and kumquats belong on the same crostini.


(photography courtesy of RVA News)

I’m also obsessed with King of Pops. Outside of Atlanta, no one has really heard of them, but they got picked up by Whole Foods Market, so they’re basically on the path to world domination. King of Pops started out as a few guys with little rainbow umbrella-shaded refrigerated carts selling popsicles in the park and now I gauge whether or not I will attend an event by the likelihood of King of Pops carts. They’re headquartered in Inman Park and even sponsor a Tuesday night yoga class in O4W next to the skate park that attracts hundreds during the nicer months (read: almost all of them), so they have my vote all around. Pro Tip — try the Blackberry Ginger Lemonade.

VINTAGE SHOP FINDS Ponce City Market has all the usual big-box stuff: Lululemon, Sephora, Williams-Sonoma, Anthropologie, etc., but if you want to find some treasures, check out Paris on Ponce and Pop Marche. They’re jam packed with vintage, handmade, wonderful, and weird from furniture to clothing to books to (occasionally) motorcycles. You never know what you’ll find.


(photography courtesy of Paris on Ponce)

HISTORICAL NEIGHBORHOODS I live just down the street from Freedom Parkway, which is modestly adorned by a cast iron sculpture of Martin Luther King. Not far is the King Center and Dr. King’s home, and it’s incredibly moving to tour the sites.

Because it’s part of our town, I think it’s easy for Atlantans to forget how special these places and monuments are, but we at least have the luxury of a holiday to remind us to go out and appreciate what’s right here at home.

Meghan Paine of Iron Heart Press gives us a down-south homestyle tour of her beloved Atlanta, Georgia.

CONSTANT GROWTH Atlanta is a living, breathing organism. Neighborhoods die, revive, gentrify, and backslide from year to year. Old Fourth Ward used to be a post-industrial tire dump, but that tire dump is now the centerpiece of the neighborhood: a stunning park with ponds and waterfalls and ducks, oh my.

NOT TO BE MISSED Just around the corner in the Highlands is a little karaoke joint that only the locals know about called 10 High. Now shhh, don’t go telling everyone you heard it from me. It’s secreted away in the basement of Dark Horse Tavern, making it feel like a prohibition secret spot kinda joint, and what makes it really great is the full band that will make you sound like a rock god, with Atlanta’s own famous radio personality English Nick singing backup for you.

Also, walk the Beltline — eventually it will be built out to connect the whole city, but my favorite section, the Eastside Trail, connects Piedmont Park (worth a half day’s visit on its own) to Krog Street. You’ll see great art, smiling faces, dogs, dogs, dogs, and you can end your walk with a beer and a tasty lunch at Krog Street Market. You might even see one of Atlanta’s Tiny Doors.

Tiny Door in Atlanta, GA.

INSIDER INSIGHTS Atlanta is a really vibrant place, rich in culture and oddity. We embrace different like a big city, but we love to support our own like only a small southern town can. Come visit, and try the cobbler.

Meghan Paine of Iron Heart Press gives us a down-south homestyle tour of her beloved Atlanta, Georgia.

LETTERPRESS STUDIOS IN ATLANTA

Hyde & Seek Press Lawrenceville, GA
Atlanta Printmakers Studio – Atlanta, GA
Alee & Press – Atlanta, GA
Bumblebee Press – Atlanta, GA
Farmwood Press – Atlanta, GA
Henry & Co. – Atlanta, GA
Cherry Laurel Studio – Decatur, GA
Megan King – Avondale Estates, GA
Aureate Press – Cumming, GA

MUST-SEE STOPS

Print Big! Atlanta Printmakers Studio’s annual community art extravaganza held in the spring. Highlights include printing by steamroller.
Georgia Aquarium – Home to the Western Hemisphere’s largest aquarium.
Margaret Mitchell House – Pulitzer Prize-winning novel “Gone With the Wind” author’s birthplace.
The Martin Luther King Jr. Center – An inspiring museum center dedicated to King Jr.’s legacy.
Atlanta Jazz Festival – Free Memorial Day Jazz fest in Piedmont Park.
Marietta Diner – Try the Spinach Pie; featured in Food Network’s Diners, Drive-in, and Dives.
World of Coca Cola – Tour the famous world-famous headquarters.
Xocolatl Chocolates – Award winning bean-to-bar chocolatier.

We hope you enjoyed our second letterpress city guide! Interested in shining the spotlight on your city? Contact us today! And if you’re planning a letterpress-centric trip, be sure to check out the print trip map on Letterpress Commons!

Top 14 Valentine’s Day Letterpress Cards for 2017

Hand-picked with love, today we’re counting down 14 beautiful, silly & sweet, and brilliant 2017 Valentine’s Day letterpress cards sure to impress your sweetie and printing paramour.  Let us know what you are getting your special someone this year in the comments below!

Valentine's Day letterpress cards of 2017 feature romance, funny love, and sweet messages.

1. We Go Together PB&J by Ramona & Ruth  |  2. You’re Good At Husband Things by Sapling Press   |  3. Love Letter Cat card by Mejiro Graphics  |  4. Big Squeeze by Alee & Press | 5. Let’s Make Each Other Mixtapes by Little Goat Paper Co  |  6. I’d Still Say I Do by Benchpressed

Valentine's Day letterpress cards of 2017 feature romance, funny love, and sweet messages.

7. Happily Ever After by rbprintery  |  8. Hand-Drawn Tree Trunk With Heart by FAsInFrankPapergoods

Valentine's Day letterpress cards of 2017 feature romance, funny love, and sweet messages.

9. You’re Souper by Wild Ink Press | 10. Of All the Fish In The Sea… by McBitterson’s | 11. Love With You Rocks by Waterknot | 12. Love & Wedding by Wolf & Wren Press | 13. Hello My Love by Smock |  14. Letterpress Conversation Heart coasters by Haute Papier

2016 Letterpress Holiday Gift Guide

We’ve making a list and checking it twice for must-have gifts for the printer & letterpress aficionado in your life in our 2016 Letterpress Holiday Gift Guide. From type-inspired goodies to printing press-themed gifts, we’ve got you covered. Let us know what is on your wishlist in the comments section below!

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1. Roller Setting Gauge by Boxcar Press  |  2. Mint Chocolate bar by LetterPress | 3. Gutenberg Wooden Model kit from Oakridge Hobbies | 4. Ampersand Necklace by GwenDelicious | 5. Anatomy of Type Letterpress poster by Typography Desconstructed | 6. The Little Book of Typographic Ornament by David Jury | 7. Ink Knife from Boxcar Press | 8. Pantone Pastel Mug Set by Pantone | 9. Sigwalt holiday ornament from Briar Press |  10.  Bon a Tirer tee shirt from Studio On Fire

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11. Lorem Ipsum Throw Pillow from typehype  |  12. Type Case drawstring bag by Hollingsworth

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13. California Job Case letterpress poster by PioneerHouse  | 14. Drop Caps : 100 Postcards book by Jessica Hische  |   15. Garamond lead type smartphone case by CARO Berlin  |   16. “Every time you make a typo, the errorists win” mug by DesignsbyLindaNeeToo  |   17. Ladies of Letterpress patch by Ladies of Letterpress  |   18. Helvetica hoodie by medium control  |   19. 12″ or 18″ Line Gauge from Boxcar Press  |   20. Letterpress clock by CAPow!